Kristin Damrow & Company

Impact

 
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JANUARY 31st — FEBRUARY 2nd
YERBA BUENA CENTER FOR THE ARTS
$30 - $60

 
 
 
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Inspired by the Brutalist movement in architecture, with its emphasis on massive exposed concrete construction, and a wistfulness for the anti-bourgeois spirit of an earlier era, Impact features a cast of 15 performers inhabiting a dystopian world in the near future. With scenic design by Alice Malia and commissioned music by Aaron M. Gold, this new contemporary dance by Kristin Damrow will lead audiences through a mirror world eerily like our own.

 
 
 
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Artistic Director Kristin Damrow grew up on a rural farm in Wisconsin before studying in Chicago where she earned a B.A. in Dance from Columbia College. Since moving to San Francisco in 2010, she has been commissioned by SAFE House Arts’ Summer Performance Festival and the DIRT Festival in San Francisco. She is also a resident artist at Iowa State University, and has taught master classes in dance at New York University Tisch School of the Arts, Columbia College Chicago, Gibney Dance (NYC), Mark Morris Dance Center (NYC), Bodyvox (Portland), and the University of San Francisco.

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San Francisco Art Institute

San Francisco Art Institute

By the late 1970’s, many Brutalist buildings were at risk of demolition. Architectural activists fought to preserve them, valuing both their importance in architectural evolution as well as their symbolic representation of socialism and the common good. Where activists were successful, Brutalist structures continue to hold a history that prioritizes equality for all people and reminds us of the power of a united community.

Brutalism was introduced to the English-speaking world in the 1950’s. The term is derived from the French phrase betón brut, meaning ‘raw concrete.’ Much of Brutalist architecture stands proud as civic and public welfare buildings, optimistic monuments of an egalitarian society. They represent function over frivolity, and were created to serve the common man. Brutalist scholar Reyner Banham said of the style, “it was an attempt to create an architectural ethic, rather than an aesthetic.”

Glen Park BART Station

Glen Park BART Station

 
 
Photos taken at the Oakland Museum or California, a brutalist building.

Photos taken at the Oakland Museum or California, a brutalist building.

 
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PERFORMERS

 

Allegra Bautista
Anna Greenberg
Heather Arnett
Hien Huynh
Shareen DeRyan

Alexa Manalansan
Brianna Torres
Dalmacio Payomo
Emily Hansel
Kyle Limin

Liselle Yap
Lydia Clinton
Marlene Garcia
Nell Suttles
Oona Wong-Danders

 
 
 

COMPOSOR

Aaron M. Gold

LIGHTING DESIGNER

Allen Willner

COSTUME DESIGNER

Rita Parks

 
 

SCENIC DESIGNER

Alice Malia

PHOTOGRAPHERS

RJ Muna

 
 
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Kristin Damrow & Company are funded by arts patrons like yourself. Please consider supporting the company with a tax-deductible donation.

A special thank you to Amy Juang, Chris Bigelow, Chris King, Christina Teav, David Slacalek, Jennifer Damrow, and Madeleine Cordier for your especially generous support.

 
 
 
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